The Indian troops left independent Bangladesh in the hands of its elected leader

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Published on December 15, 2021
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Approximately one crore Bengalis took shelter in India when the Pakistani junta started crackdown and genocide on the ordinary people in Bengal in 1971. Indian government showed humanity to our ancestors like the Awami League government does to the Rohingyas who were persecuted by the Myanmar army. India also withdrew its troops from Bangladesh after handing over the country to the elected representative following the birth of Bangladesh that cost thirty million lives. Such a quick departure after the victory is unique in history.

It was only possible because of the respect of the Indians towards the Father of the Bengali Nation Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman and his leadership. During the Liberation War, the then Indian Prime Minister Indira Gandhi raised voices for Bangabandhu in the international community. In November 1971, the Pakistani junta offered a bilateral meeting to her. But rejecting that, she demanded the release of Bangabandhu from Pakistani prison, saying, "I have nothing to discuss with Yahya. Negotiations with Sheikh Mujib can be an effective solution because he is the elected leader of the Bengali people.”

Earlier, in a message sent to the UN General Assembly on May 13, 1971, the Indian Premier said, "The people of Bangladesh have a fair demand that their elected representatives rule their country. Hopefully, the people of the world will support this demand and work for the restoration of their rights.”

The Pakistan forces, on one side, were committing genocide and rape on the battlefields, on the other side, they were also plotting to assassinate Bangabandhu in prison. Realizing the situation, Indian Prime Minister Gandhi and Yugoslav President Joseph Tito sent warnings to Pakistan in a joint statement on October 21.

The Pakistani junta dropped bombs on Indian soil on December 3 for supporting the freedom fighters and the helpless Bengali nation. Then, India recognized Bangladesh as an independent state on December 6 and deployed its troops in direct support of the freedom fighters.

Addressing a programme at Delhi University on December 10, Smt. Gandhi said, “India will win completely only when Bangladesh and its leaders are free, and they will return to the motherland and form a government. One crore refugees will return to the independent sovereign homeland from India.” 

The Pakistani invaders surrendered to the Allied forces consisting of freedom fighters and Indian troops in the afternoon of December 16. On the same day, at 5.30 pm, Smt. Indira Gandhi told the Lok Sabha and Rajya Sabha session, “We congratulate the people of Bangladesh on their victory. We believe that Sheikh Mujibur Rahman, the father of the nation of this new country, will bring the country towards peace and prosperity by leading his people.” 

The people and government of India kept their words. After thwarting the conspiracy of the Pakistanis, Bangabandhu returned to the country on January 10, 1972. And then, in less than three months, the Allied forces left Bangladesh –which is a rare incident in the history of the world.

The Indian troops left independent Bangladesh in the hands of its elected leader

Approximately one crore Bengalis took shelter in India when the Pakistani junta started crackdown and genocide on the ordinary people in Bengal in 1971. Indian government showed humanity to our ancestors like the Awami League government does to the Rohingyas who were persecuted by the Myanmar army. India also withdrew its troops from Bangladesh after handing over the country to the elected representative following the birth of Bangladesh that cost thirty million lives. Such a quick departure after the victory is unique in history.

It was only possible because of the respect of the Indians towards the Father of the Bengali Nation Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman and his leadership. During the Liberation War, the then Indian Prime Minister Indira Gandhi raised voices for Bangabandhu in the international community. In November 1971, the Pakistani junta offered a bilateral meeting to her. But rejecting that, she demanded the release of Bangabandhu from Pakistani prison, saying, "I have nothing to discuss with Yahya. Negotiations with Sheikh Mujib can be an effective solution because he is the elected leader of the Bengali people.”

Earlier, in a message sent to the UN General Assembly on May 13, 1971, the Indian Premier said, "The people of Bangladesh have a fair demand that their elected representatives rule their country. Hopefully, the people of the world will support this demand and work for the restoration of their rights.”

The Pakistan forces, on one side, were committing genocide and rape on the battlefields, on the other side, they were also plotting to assassinate Bangabandhu in prison. Realizing the situation, Indian Prime Minister Gandhi and Yugoslav President Joseph Tito sent warnings to Pakistan in a joint statement on October 21.

The Pakistani junta dropped bombs on Indian soil on December 3 for supporting the freedom fighters and the helpless Bengali nation. Then, India recognized Bangladesh as an independent state on December 6 and deployed its troops in direct support of the freedom fighters.

Addressing a programme at Delhi University on December 10, Smt. Gandhi said, “India will win completely only when Bangladesh and its leaders are free, and they will return to the motherland and form a government. One crore refugees will return to the independent sovereign homeland from India.”

The Pakistani invaders surrendered to the Allied forces consisting of freedom fighters and Indian troops in the afternoon of December 16. On the same day, at 5.30 pm, Smt. Indira Gandhi told the Lok Sabha and Rajya Sabha session, “We congratulate the people of Bangladesh on their victory. We believe that Sheikh Mujibur Rahman, the father of the nation of this new country, will bring the country towards peace and prosperity by leading his people.”

The people and government of India kept their words. After thwarting the conspiracy of the Pakistanis, Bangabandhu returned to the country on January 10, 1972. And then, in less than three months, the Allied forces left Bangladesh –which is a rare incident in the history of the world.